Tight Lacing vs Waist Training - CorsetCenter.com

Tight Lacing vs Waist Training

Although tight lacing and waist training are both done using the same kind of high quality corsets, there is a significant difference between the two.

Tight Lacing

The simple definition of tight lacing is that it’s the practice of wearing a tightly laced corset. It gets a little more complex from there. Tight lacing can mean different things to different people and is often somewhat incorrectly used interchangeably with waist training.

For some people, tight lacing means challenging yourself occasionally for a particular purpose, like to fit into specific dress or to shape your silhouette to fit into vintage clothes. Tight lacing could be done for a photoshoot, a special night out (or in!), or even for a costume party.

To other people, tight lacing refers to wearing a corset nearly all the time, removing it only to bathe, so as to maintain the pressure on the waist.

While these definitions of tight lacing are drastically different, the one thing they have in common is that you’re wearing the corset just because you prefer to wear it. This is the major difference between tight lacing and waist training.

Waist Training

When waist training, you’re trying to make a semi-permanent change to your body by wearing a corset for a lengthy period of time. People will typically start with a goal – they want to reduce their waistline by so many inches or they want to get to a certain size. Sometimes, they’ll even want to change their entire silhouette by making themselves curvier or moving onto a more challenging corset shape.

How long it will take you to waist train will depend on a few things, like where you are when you start, where you’re trying to get to, and how long you’re willing to stick it out. The more dramatic the change, the longer it’s going to take to get there. There’s also a greater chance that drastic results won’t last very long without continued corset wear.

Waist training is not necessarily a permanent change. The human body is designed to bounce back so once you remove the corset, your waistline is going to begin fighting to return to its natural size and shape. Once you’re reached your goal, you’ll either need to continue wearing the corset regularly or at the very least put it back on occasionally for maintenance.

Choosing the Right Corset

The kind of corset you need for either waist training or tight lacing differs greatly from what you will find in a lingerie shop.

First, a corset meant for waist training or tight lacing will have steel boning throughout, which is what give the corset its structure. Plastic bones are not strong enough to hold up to waist training or tight lacing as they will easily bend or break.

Next, make sure it’s made of high quality fabric. While the outside should be durable and able to withstand the pulling and pressure exerted on it, you want the side that sits against your skin to be soft enough that it won’t cause any rubbing or chafing. Typically, the inner lining on these corsets is made of cotton.

The busk is the closure of the corset that is in the front of the body so you can easily unbutton or unzip it to take it off without worrying about the ties in the back. The busk should be made of something strong, like steel, so you know it will be able to hold up to the pressure created by tightening the corset.

If you’re thinking about trying waist training or tight lacing, here are some other things to keep in mind:

  • Get the right size and shape corset for your body. You want the process to be as comfortable as possible and that starts with the right fit. When wearing it, you should feel pressure but not pain. If you’re in between sizes, go with the larger one so it isn’t too tight.
  • You’ll need to spend some time breaking your corset in. The boning will conform to your body shape naturally over time, so take it slow. You should only wear your corset for about two hours at a time at first to give it time to break in.
  • Remember, waist training is a slow and steady process. Slowly increase the amount of time you wear your corset every day. Work your way up from two hours to eight hours over about two weeks. And don’t forget to take a break and only wear it for a few hours on some days.
  • If you decide to waist train while you sleep, leave tie your corset about an inch and a half looser than you would during the day for safety and comfort.
  • Stick to a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen, but never exercise while wearing your corset.
  • If you want the best results, you’ll have to invest in a high quality corset.

There are also a few different styles of corsets to consider. They can all be effectively used for waist training and tight lacing, so which style you choose really comes down to what you prefer.

Underbust corsets provide an hourglass shape but don’t give any support to the breasts. You can wear this style over almost any dress or shirt. Underbust corsets come in several lengths and styles, so you can find one that fits your body type whether you have a long or short torso, wide shoulders, or if you need some support for your breasts.Underbust Corset

Overbust corsets sit just below the arms and stop right at the hips. They provide a lot of coverage while still shaping the waist. Overbust corsets are great for large breasted women since there’s no  need to worry about any additional support. They also provide a lot of back support. While these can also be worn over certain shirts and dresses, they’re not as versatile as an underbust corset.Overbust Corset

The One Big Difference

Waist training and tight lacing are different schools of thought when it comes to corseting. They use the same high quality corsets designs for different reasons. If you’re waist training, the corset is the means to the end of reaching a predetermined goal for your waist. With tightlacing, wearing the corset is the only objective.

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